Schwimer Shipped Off With Being Out Of Favor And A Bullpen Glut

Phils acquire first baseman Charles for Schwimer

 

By Todd Zolecki / MLB.com | 02/23/2013 6:31 PM ET

 

CLEARWATER, Fla. — There is more to the Michael Schwimer trade than just a glut of relief pitchers in Phillies camp.

 

Michael Schwimer

Michael Schwimer (Photo credit: Keith Allison)

 

The Phillies announced Saturday that they traded Schwimer to the Toronto Blue Jays for Minor League first baseman Art Charles. Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. said they shipped Schwimer to Toronto because they had depth in the bullpen, they needed to anticipate future roster moves and they needed power at the Minor League level. But Schwimer had fallen out of favor with the organization after he disputed the Phillies’ decision to send him to Triple-A Lehigh Valley in August, claiming he was injured, although there also had been other issues.

 

It might be more accurate to call this trade addition by subtraction.

 

“He’s a great kid,” said Amaro, when asked if last season’s dispute sparked the trade. “There’s nothing wrong with Schwim.”

 

Schwimer said he agreed, but added one caveat.

 

“The Phillies want to win, period, so they’re not going to let any petty differences affect them wanting to win,” he said. “So, in my opinion, I think that had absolutely zero effect.”

 

English: Cole Hamels of the Philadelphia Phill...

Cole Hamels

 

Major League Baseball rules prevent a team from sending a player to the Minor Leagues while injured. The Phillies optioned Schwimer to Lehigh Valley on Aug. 23. He said he was hurt and should have been placed on the disabled list, but the Phillies disagreed. Schwimer didn’t report to the team immediately as he sought a second opinion. And while no formal grievance has been filed, Schwimer said, “As far as I’m concerned it’s an open issue. Nothing has been filed. Nothing has been done. But it’s still definitely an open issue.”

 

“There’s a lot of things I can’t get into with that,” he added. “What I will say was there was definitely a disconnect in communication from what I … that’s all I’m going to say. It was nothing personal against them, it was nothing personal against me. As a young player, you really don’t know how to handle certain things, and in their opinion I handled things the wrong way, and in my opinion they handled things … it was just a communication difference.”

 

Schwimer also got into trouble earlier in the season when he tweeted roster moves before they became official. And while there was a personality conflict at times, Schwimer was highly complimentary to the organization Saturday.

 

“This is a business,” Schwimer said. “Everybody has to do what they think will make the team better. I respect their decision completely. I absolutely loved my time with the Phillies. They drafted me in 2008, called me up to the big leagues and … if I wasn’t a Phillie I would never have met my wife, so there’s a lot of life things and a lot of both on and off the field things that would never have happened if I wasn’t a Philadelphia Phillie. I loved the teammates and the team. I hope we meet in the World Series. It’s been a great time and a great ride.”

 

Even with a plethora of relievers in camp, it is unusual to trade a pitcher like Schwimer, who has plenty of potential. He had a 7.56 ERA through nine appearances last season, but a 3.46 ERA in his final 26 appearances. He also has options remaining, which makes him valuable.

 

“It’s an arm that should pitch in the big leagues,” pitching coach Rich Dubee said. “He’s got plenty of talent to pitch in the big leagues. He’s got to get some presence. He’s got to get some composure on the mound. He’s got to understand who he is and what he is as a pitcher. But he’s got to stick to doing things the right way instead of trying to be too macho at times and coming out of his delivery.”

 

Asked if he felt like he needed to make this trade now, Amaro said, “No, we didn’t have to. We could have waited, but we felt like it was the right thing to do right now for us.”

 

Charles, 22, hit .236 with 15 doubles, four triples, 13 home runs, 34 RBIs and a .909 OPS combined with Rookie level Bluefield and Class A Vancouver.

 

“Charles is a guy that has got big pop,” Amaro said. “Whether he is going to be a Major League hitter at some point, we don’t know. But we know he has a lot of power and is a pretty decent athlete. He’s a big kid, and we’ll see — a lot of home runs, a lot of strikeouts, a lot of walks. We’ll see. We’re taking a chance on a guy.”

 

Hamels feeling urge to accept leadership role

 

CLEARWATER, Fla. — Nobody has said a word to Cole Hamels about Opening Day, which is fine with him.

 

Pitching the season opener would be nice, but …

 

“I’ve never really thought about it,” he said after pitching two scoreless innings Saturday in the Phillies’ Grapefruit League opener against Houston at Bright House Field. “It’s one game, one appearance and then you’re back into the normal baseball atmosphere. I’ve never really looked at it as this big sort of ordeal. I’ve always valued the playoffs. When you have to lead off the playoff game and a series, I think that’s pretty important. I think that’s kind of where it’s at. If you do get that honor, you just go out and stick to business and try to win a ballgame.”

 

Hamels is expected to start Opening Day on April 1, but that is more than a month away. Saturday simply represented the first step toward what Hamels hopes is a late run into October. That is what he is preparing for, and that is what is on his mind.

 

It is why he said he declined to participate in the World Baseball Classic.

 

“I don’t think it’s the smartest thing for pitchers to do,” he said. “Ultimately, I think a lot of the pitchers have the right idea, too. You don’t see any of the big-time guys up there. I think ultimately our goal is to win a World Series, not the WBC. That’s something I’m always going to keep on track, that’s first and foremost — winning the World Series. I’m going to do everything I can for the Phillies and this organization and my teammates.”

 

So Hamels also acknowledged he could step into more of a leadership role this season. Phillies right-hander Roy Halladay said earlier this week it’s Hamels’ time to start Opening Day. He also said it’s time for him to become more vocal as a leader. Those comments came before closer Jonathan Papelbon said he hadn’t seen any leadership in the clubhouse since he has been here.

 

“I’m almost 30, so I should probably kick it in gear with the leadership role,” Hamels said. “I have been here for a long time and I’ve seen some leaders leave, like Pat [Burrell], [Jamie] Moyer and Jayson Werth and Aaron Rowand — those guys were big-time leaders. You can’t expect new guys to come in and lead a team. They have to feel it out. I agree with Pap. Last year, I wasn’t fulfilling my end of the bargain either. We are all guilty. We all have to step up and take a role and a presence in this team and get back to what we’re capable of doing, which is winning.”

 

Hamels used to talk about throwing perfect games and winning Cy Young Awards, but that is on the back burner. He said he sees a sense of urgency in the clubhouse this spring as some players sense the window of opportunity to win closing.

 

So the Cy Young Award? Eh, that would be a nice bonus.

 

“I’d be lying if I didn’t say it would be nice to have one,” he said. “I would trade Cy Youngs for World Series rings any day of the week, and I think [Cliff Lee and Halladay] would, too. That’s the reason why we play baseball — to win championships, not a plaque to put on the wall.”

 

Utley steps right up in game action, feels ‘perfect’

 

CLEARWATER, Fla. — It had been a couple years of setbacks and soreness, but Chase Utley is finally back on the field.

 

He played three innings Saturday in the Phillies’ Grapefruit League opener against the Houston Astros at Bright House Field. It was his first Spring Training game since 2010 because of problems with chronically injured knees. Utley went 1-for-2 with one RBI, ripping the first pitch he saw from Astros right-hander Lucas Harrell up the middle in the first inning to score a run in the 8-3 loss.

 

“It was a good first step,” Utley said.

 

Utley isn’t sure how much he will play this spring or if he will be on a routine schedule like other players in camp, but he will not play Sunday against the Tigers in Lakeland. He is expected back in the lineup Monday against the Tigers in Clearwater.

 

“To be honest, I forgot what a normal Spring Training schedule is,” he said. “No, what Charlie [Manuel] and I have planned, there will be plenty of games under my belt. So far so good. Things are progressing well. … The last couple of Spring Trainings I was just trying to figure out a way to get on the field, and that didn’t work. This year, the stuff I did in the offseason has worked so far. Hopefully it will give me a chance to not only know what I need to do to get on the field but to actually make some progressions while playing.”

 

But the biggest question is: no pain in the knees?

 

“I feel good,” he said. “Perfect.”

 

Todd Zolecki is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

 

Advertisements

3B, SS, 2B, OF Young Can Fill A Lot Of Holes On Any Given Day

Michael Brian Young is a Major League Baseball infielder for the Philadelphia Phillies. He has been named to Major League Baseball All-Star Game seven times. In 2005, he was the American League batting champion.

Born: October 19, 1976 (age 36), Covina
Nationality: American
Salary: 16 million USD (2012)
TeamTexas Rangers (#10 / First baseman)

Phillies’ deal for Young finally official

Veteran infielder ticketed to fill ballclub’s hole at third base

By Paul Hagen / MLB.com

PHILADELPHIA — It wasn’t easy, and it certainly wasn’t quick, but the long-simmering deal that made Rangers icon Michael Young the Phillies’ new third baseman finally became official on Sunday.

With that, after a cautious start to the offseason, the Phils addressed their two most pressing offseason needs within a matter of days. They had also been seeking a center fielder, and checked that off the list as the Winter Meetings in Nashville, Tenn., were wrapping up on Thursday, with the deal that brought Ben Revere from the Twins for right-handers Vance Worley and Trevor May.

Young, 36, the Rangers’ all-time leader in games, at-bats, runs, hits, doubles and triples, had the right to veto any trade. However, staying in Texas would likely have meant a utility role and less playing time. With the Phillies, he’ll be penciled in as the everyday third baseman. Injuries to Placido Polanco meant the team had seven different players start at least one game at the hot corner in 2012: Polanco, Kevin Frandsen, Mike Fontenot, Ty Wigginton, Pete Orr, Michael Martinez and Hector Luna.

He’s a seven-time All-Star, who didn’t have his best offensive season in 2012. Young played in 156 games for the Rangers last season, batting .277 with eight homers, 67 RBIs and a .682 OPS.

“Clearly, this brings a wonderful package to what we’re trying to do here in Philadelphia,” said Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. “One, he’s a very, very good ballplayer. He has a tremendous track record. He has all the elements we’re looking for.

“First of all, the make-up is extraordinary. He’s the ultimate team player. He knows how to play baseball. He’s a winning baseball player. He’s had the opportunity to be in big games in the playoffs, and he just fits real well. The fact that he hits right-handed helps balance our lineup out a little bit, as well. I just think all the elements he brings to the table for us are very, very positive.

“I think [having a down year is] just part of the process of being a Major League player. You don’t have a great year every year. But at the same time, even when his numbers aren’t extraordinary — and they were still pretty darn good last year, maybe better than anybody we had on our club — the fact of the matter is, he’s a professional hitter. Even when he’s not having productive hits, I know he’s the kind of guy who makes productive outs. So there’s a lot of pluses to this guy.”

“He made an adjustment in September and bounced back some [with a .361 batting average and .897 OPS in his last 20 games],” said Rangers general manager Jon Daniels. “We fully expect him to have a better offensive year than he did last year. He’ll be better in Philadelphia than he was last season. The opportunity for him to play third base in Philadelphia was more than we could promise here. As the Phillies pushed for Michael and we got comfortable with the return, we presented the option to Michael and his family for them to make the decision.”

The Phillies hope he can rebound, but are also trying to stabilize the third base — while giving Cody Asche, who played last season at Double-A Reading, more time to develop.

“This is a very tough situation,” Rangers manager Ron Washington said. “He has always been my go-to guy in my six years here. He has always done a lot for me. He has been a leader for the organization on the field, in the clubhouse and in the community. He certainly will be missed.”

The Rangers received right-handed reliever Josh Lindblom and a Minor League pitcher, Lisalverto Bonilla in return. The guidelines of the trade were agreed to in Nashville, but it took days for Young to agree to waive his no-trade clause and for the Commissioner’s office to approve the money involved.

The Phillies will pay $5.5 million of the $16 million Young will make in the final year of his contract next season. In addition, the teams will split the additional $1.2 million that Young negotiated to accept the trade, in part to cover the difference in state income tax between Texas and Pennsylvania.

Lindblom 25, was acquired from the Dodgers along with Ethan Martin and a player to be named, which turned out to be Stefan Jarrin, for Shane Victorino at the Trade Deadline. He spent the remainder of the season with the Phillies, going 1-3 with a 4.63 ERA in 26 appearances.

Bonilla, 22, is an intriguing player. After being converted from starter to reliever, he pitched himself onto the Phillies’ radar this season. After starting the season at Class A Clearwater, he was promoted to Reading and was named to the Eastern League Mid-Season All-Star team. He was a combined 3-2 with a 1.55 ERA when he was picked for the Futures All-Star Game in Kansas City, and was ranked as the team’s No. 15 prospect by MLB.com.

However, he injured his right thumb while involved in what was reported as “horseplay” the night before that game and didn’t pitch again in ’12. He’s currently 1-4 with a 6.92 ERA in 15 games for the Leones del Escogido in the Dominican Winter League.

“Lindblom was one of the guys who was very important for us when we traded Shane Victorino,” Amaro said. “I think, just by virtue of the fact that we didn’t have an eighth-inning guy, we put him in a position to pitch in the eighth. He may very well do that very proficiently at some point, but he’s probably not ready to do that quite yet. He’s probably more comfortable in the sixth and seventh [innings]. That may be his bailiwick. That may change moving forward. But we had to put him in a position he probably, frankly, wasn’t ready for. He had a tough time of it at times. But he’s a very good pitcher.

Michael Young Michael Young #10 of the Texas Rangers at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington on August 27, 2012 in Arlington, Texas.

“As far as Bonilla goes, he has a tremendous arm. He’s still a little raw. Great [fastball-changeup] combination. He’s going to be a big league pitcher, and an effective one. There’s no question he’s going to be an effective big league pitcher. No question. Again, we feel like that’s one of the areas we’re dealing from a position of strength … so we felt like we were comfortable enough that to get this type of everyday player, this was the right thing for us.”

Now, Amaro will turn his attention to addressing other needs.

“Obviously, with the hole that was created by the move with Vance Worley to get Ben, we’re looking at the possibility of getting a little bit of depth there. [Tyler] Cloyd and [Jonathan] Pettibone will fight it out. Maybe Martin or somebody else will step up at some point. Or maybe even [Adam] Morgan.

“But we’ll probably look to add a low-risk, high-reward type of guy or somebody who’s come back from an injury or someone like that who can battle for that fifth spot. A lot of teams have had some success looking for that guy late in the season and finding that productive guy. So that’s one possibility. We’re still looking into the bullpen and trying add a veteran presence there, as well. And if we can do a little bit more for our outfield, we’ll consider that, as well.

“We’d love to add more home runs. But for me, again, it’s about production. If we can produce runs — and I know that Ben can and I know that Michael can — and we have to get production out of the middle of our lineup, the guys we’ve paid to produce those runs. If we can get complementary [contributions] from Ben and Michael and get the kind of production we expect out of Ryan [Howard] and Chase [Utley], I think we’re going to be fine.”

Paul Hagen is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

Young will feel at home with Phillies

Veteran is joining a team filled with players who are all about winning

Richard JusticeBy Richard Justice

Phillies manager Charlie Manuel is going to love Michael Young — and so will Jimmy Rollins, Ryan Howard, etc. Young will fit nicely on a team that prides itself on playing the game right, on playing hard and on competing like crazy.

If that sounds like basic stuff, it is. At least it is for the good teams. And some teams do it better than others. When the Phillies were winning five straight National League East division championships between 2007 and 2011, they played with toughness and an edge.

Young plays that way, too. There are legitimate questions about how good he still is, about his power and defense and all the rest. But he did hit .277 and have 27 doubles in 2012 in his worst season in a decade. In terms of presence and being a good teammate, the Phillies simply couldn’t have found anyone better.

Young’s legacy with the Rangers should not be underestimated. First, he’s one of the most decent people you’ll never meet. It’s almost impossible to imagine anyone disliking Young.

He led the Rangers out of the Alex Rodriguez years — back to a clubhouse environment that was about 25 guys instead of one. He helped lead them back to winning, too, as Rangers general manager Jon Daniels began accumulating talent and doing his job better than almost anyone.

Along the way, Young became the face of the franchise and its most popular player. He was one of baseball’s best players for about seven years. Between 2004 and 2010, he averaged 18 home runs and 50 walks a season, while compiling an .819 OPS. He leaves the Rangers as a seven-time All-Star who twice finished in the Top 10 of American League Most Valuable Player balloting.

His numbers can’t be measured just in his play on the field. He was the leader of the Rangers, their spokesman and the guy who set a tone. When Yu Darvish joined the Rangers last offseason, some of us wondered how comfortable he’d be, given the cultural leap from Japan to Texas.

“He’ll be fine,” Young said. “Believe me, if you can’t get along with the guys in here, you’re the one with the problem.”

Young was a large reason for that environment. Third baseman Adrian Beltre probably took on more of a leadership mantle last season as Young’s play declined. But the Rangers probably don’t win back-to-back AL championships in 2010 and ’11 without Young’s contributions, both measured and otherwise.

Daniels had toyed with trading him twice before. Young had a tough time swallowing those discussions, and also the moves from second base to third to first. He always did what the Rangers believed was best for the team, but he didn’t always agree. He twice asked to be traded, but rescinded both demands and apologized to teammates for being a distraction.

When fans would criticize his defense, Young would say, “Well, I would have liked to have spent my entire career at one position, but those aren’t my decisions.”

Because Young was the face of the franchise, because his power declined dramatically the last two seasons — from 21 home runs in 2010 to 11 and eight the last two years — Young became the No. 1 target of criticism from fans on talk radio and blogs in Dallas-Fort Worth.

It’s always odd to see fans turn on some of the guys who’ve performed the best and attempted to do everything correctly. But Young never lashed out. If he was angry — and he surely was — he never showed it.

He has agreed to be traded to the Phillies, as Daniels is attempting a dramatic reshaping of the Rangers. Part of that reshaping is moving second baseman Ian Kinsler to first and inserting highly-regarded rookie Jurickson Profar at second.

Meanwhile, the Phillies have an opening at third base. It’s a no-risk move, since the Rangers are paying most of Young’s salary. Knowing how prideful Young is, there won’t be many more motivated players next season.

He’ll love Philadelphia because the ballpark will be filled and the clubhouse has a bunch of guys — Howard, Rollins, Cole Hamels, Chase Utley — who are accustomed to winning and know how to win.

That’s what Young has always been about, too. He had a terrific 13-year run with the Rangers. Regardless of what he does in this next chapter of his career, he’ll always be a Texas Ranger, one of its most popular and productive players ever. Here’s to another great season or two or three from one of the really good guys.

Richard Justice is a columnist for MLB.com. Read his blog, Justice4U. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

MICHAEL YOUNG STATS SUMMARY

G AB R H TB 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG  
SEASON 156 611 79 169 226 27 3 8 67 33 70 2 2 .277 .312 .370
MLB Totals 1823 7399 1085 2230 3286 415 55 177 984 532 1152 89 30 .301 .347 .444
Minors Totals 524 2015 330 597 906 132 21 45 325 222 367 83 30 .296 .367 .450

Awards and Honors

MLB PLAYERS CHOICE MAN OF THE YEAR
2008: Texas (AL)
2011: Texas (AL)
ALL-STAR
2004: Texas (AL)
2005: Texas (AL)
2006: Texas (AL)
2007: Texas (AL)
2008: Texas (AL)
2009: Texas (AL)
2011: Texas (AL)
PLAYER OF THE WEEK
6/16/2002: Texas (AL)
8/24/2009: Texas (AL)
6/27/2011: Texas (AL)
RANGERS HEART AND HUSTLE AWARD
2006: Texas (AL)
2007: Texas (AL)
2009: Texas (AL)
2010: Texas (AL)
RANGERS MVP
2004: Texas (AL)
2005: Texas (AL)
2007: Texas (AL)
2009: Texas (AL)
RAWLINGS GOLD GLOVE
2008: Texas (AL)
RANGERS HAROLD MCKINNEY GOOD GUY AWARD
2003: Texas (AL)
RANGERS ROOKIE OF THE YEAR
2001: Texas (AL)

Related articles

 

Pennant Races In Full Tilt Boogie | MLB.com: News

The Week Ahead: Pennant drives kick into high gear

By Doug Miller / MLB.com | 08/06/12 10:00 AM ET

via The Week Ahead: MLB pennant drives kick into high gear | MLB.com: News.

We’re moving into the second week of August. The dog days are upon us. September isn’t that far away. That means October isn’t, either.

Andrew McCutchen

Andrew McCutchen

In baseball terms, this means things are getting serious, and this week, we’ll start seeing how serious. This is the first full week of play after the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline and the second week of the open period in which we might see a few juicy waiver deals.

This means new faces in old places, and a whole lot of eyes on just how effective these marriages will be.

The Angels might be wondering more than anyone, having brought in the pitching prize of the trade season, starter Zack Greinke. Mike Scioscia‘s club gets a stern test of its mettle early this week in tough road games against the division-rival A’s, and Greinke’s contributions every five days won’t matter much if Scioscia’s bullpen can’t get it together better than it has in recent days.

“We’ve had a rough three weeks as far as our starters, and what our starters do obviously has an impact on your bullpen roles,” Scioscia said after watching his relievers struggle again Sunday in a 4-2 loss to the White Sox in Chicago.

“These guys are good. It’s not going to take long to reset, but we need to get our starters getting deeper into games and we have arms down there [in the bullpen] that will get the outs. It didn’t happen this afternoon, but it will.”

Meanwhile, the Dodgers, who are right there with the Giants and the surging D-backs in a wide-open National League West, did more than anyone at the Deadline, landing Hanley Ramirez, Shane Victorino and Brandon League. Then they got starter Joe Blanton in a waiver deal with Philadelphia.

So of course Blanton did his job Sunday, turning in six innings of two-run, five-strikeout ball in a no-decision, and Ramirez did his, winning the game against the Cubs with a walk-off hit.

Now they head into the new week with a revamped roster, three home games against struggling Colorado, and only a half-game division deficit. Things are looking up.

“I think this time of year we’re not so much worried about one game to the next,” Dodgers manager Don Mattingly said. “We’re worried about getting a win and you try to get a win that day.”

Mattingly’s sentiments are shared among a number of clubs, including the team right there with the Dodgers, Bruce Bochy’s San Francisco Giants, plus the red-hot Reds, the first-place Rangers, the first-place Nationals, the AL East-leading Yankees and other contenders in an increasingly intriguing drive toward pennants.

For Cincinnati, which lost for the first time in six games on Sunday but remains in charge in the NL Central, the week will bring a road test: three games at Milwaukee and four at Wrigley Field against the Cubs. But the Reds are hungry.

“You get greedy, and you start winning every ballgame, and two out of three all of a sudden doesn’t appear to be good enough,” Reds manager Dusty Baker said Sunday. “We’ll take a 5-2 homestand. We want more; you always want more.”

Indeed.

The Chicago White Sox want more, now that they’re back in control of the AL Central. Their early big trade acquisition, Kevin Youkilis, homered again Sunday and is looking more and more like the Kevin Youkilis of 2007 and 2008. Their new reliever, Brett Myers, is fitting in.

This week, Robin Ventura‘s gang, which just took a series from the Angels, stays home for three against the Royals and three against the A’s. Lefty Chris Sale will be back on the mound after 10 days of rest. They hope to keep things rolling on the South Side.

“We’ve had a lot of games in the past couple months where we’ve swung the bats well, scored a lot of runs,” club leader Paul Konerko said. “But you like to see yourself win those close ones, especially against real good ballclubs.”

Contenders such as the Braves, Cardinals, Pirates and D-backs will be thinking the same things as they enter this pivotal week. So will the Orioles and Rays, a game apart for second place behind the Yankees.

What will the new week bring? More drama. More clues to what we might see in the Division Series, Championship Series and Fall Classic.

Just take it from Pirates MVP candidate Andrew McCutchen, who homered Sunday in his team’s road win against the Reds, an exciting type of situation that only figures to intensify in coming weeks.

“Definitely,” McCutchen said when asked if it felt like October.

“I’ve never been in a playoff, but I’m sure it kinda feels like that.”

American League
Division Leaders W L PCT WCGB WCE # L10 STRK LAST GAME NEXT GAME
NY Yankees 63 44 .589 5-5 W1 8/5 vs SEA, W 6-2 8/6 @ DET, 7:05 PM
Texas 63 44 .589 5-5 L1 8/5 @ KC, L 6-7 8/6 @ BOS, 7:10 PM
Chi White Sox 59 48 .551 7-3 W1 8/5 vs LAA, W 4-2 8/6 vs KC, 8:10 PM
The top two Wild Card teams from each league make the postseason and play each other in a one-game playoff.
Wild Card Teams W L PCT WCGB WCE # L10 STRK LAST GAME NEXT GAME
Detroit 58 50 .537 5-5 W4 8/5 vs CLE, W 10-8 8/6 vs NYY, 7:05 PM
Oakland 58 50 .537 5-5 L2 8/5 vs TOR, L 5-6 8/6 vs LAA, 10:05 PM
LA Angels 58 51 .532 0.5 54 4-6 L1 8/5 @ CWS, L 2-4 8/6 @ OAK, 10:05 PM
Baltimore 57 51 .528 1.0 54 6-4 W2 8/5 @ TB, W 1-0 8/6 vs SEA, 7:05 PM
Tampa Bay 56 52 .519 2.0 53 5-5 L2 8/5 vs BAL, L 0-1 8/7 vs TOR, 7:10 PM
Boston 54 55 .495 4.5 50 5-5 W1 8/5 vs MIN, W 6-4 8/6 vs TEX, 7:10 PM
Toronto 53 55 .491 5.0 50 4-6 W2 8/5 @ OAK, W 6-5 8/7 @ TB, 7:10 PM
Seattle 51 59 .464 8.0 46 8-2 L1 8/5 @ NYY, L 2-6 8/6 @ BAL, 7:05 PM
Cleveland 50 58 .463 8.0 47 1-9 L9 8/5 @ DET, L 8-10 8/6 vs MIN, 7:05 PM
Minnesota 47 61 .435 11.0 44 7-3 L1 8/5 @ BOS, L 4-6 8/6 @ CLE, 7:05 PM
Kansas City 45 62 .421 12.5 43 4-6 W1 8/5 vs TEX, W 7-6 8/6 @ CWS, 8:10 PM
National League
Division Leaders W L PCT WCGB WCE # L10 STRK LAST GAME NEXT GAME
Cincinnati 66 42 .611 8-2 L1 8/5 vs PIT, L 2-6 8/6 @ MIL, 8:10 PM
Washington 65 43 .602 6-4 W2 8/5 vs MIA, W 4-1 8/6 @ HOU, 8:05 PM
San Francisco 59 49 .546 4-6 W3 8/5 @ COL, W 8-3 8/6 @ STL, 8:15 PM
The top two Wild Card teams from each league make the postseason and play each other in a one-game playoff.
Wild Card Teams W L PCT WCGB WCE # L10 STRK LAST GAME NEXT GAME
Atlanta 62 46 .574 8-2 W1 8/5 vs HOU, W 6-1 8/6 @ PHI, 7:05 PM
Pittsburgh 61 46 .570 6-4 W1 8/5 @ CIN, W 6-2 8/6 vs ARI, 7:05 PM
St. Louis 59 49 .546 2.5 53 7-3 W3 8/5 vs MIL, W 3-0 8/6 vs SF, 8:15 PM
LA Dodgers 59 50 .541 3.0 52 6-4 W3 8/5 vs CHC, W 7-6 8/6 vs COL, 10:10 PM
Arizona 55 53 .509 6.5 49 6-4 L2 8/5 @ PHI, L 4-5 8/6 @ PIT, 7:05 PM
NY Mets 53 56 .486 9.0 46 5-5 L1 8/5 @ SD, L 3-7 8/7 vs MIA, 7:10 PM
Philadelphia 49 59 .454 12.5 43 5-5 W2 8/5 vs ARI, W 5-4 8/6 vs ATL, 7:05 PM
Miami 49 60 .450 13.0 42 4-6 L2 8/5 @ WSH, L 1-4 8/7 @ NYM, 7:10 PM
Milwaukee 48 59 .449 13.0 43 4-6 L3 8/5 @ STL, L 0-3 8/6 vs CIN, 8:10 PM
San Diego 46 64 .418 16.5 38 4-6 W1 8/5 vs NYM, W 7-3 8/6 vs CHC, 10:05 PM
Chi Cubs 43 63 .406 17.5 39 3-7 L5 8/5 @ LAD, L 6-7 8/6 @ SD, 10:05 PM
Colorado 38 68 .358 22.5 34 2-8 L3 8/5 vs SF, L 3-8 8/6 @ LAD, 10:10 PM
Houston 36 73 .330 26.0 29 2-8 L1 8/5 @ ATL, L 1-6 8/6 vs WSH, 8:05 PM

x – clinched playoff berth

Phils Playoff Chances Heading Into Halfway Point

How Many Wins Will the Phillies Need to Make the Playoffs?

June 21, 2012, 2:10 pm
By Andrew Kulp  (email)
The700Level.com
The Daily News ran a column this morning that set out to answer that very question. David Murphy did the leg work, and based on results from previous years, he concluded the Phillies need to reach the 88-win markto qualify for the postseason.The reasoning is simple. In each full season since the Wild Card was adopted in 1995, the club that would have earned the newly invented second WC spot finished with at least 88 wins on all but two out of 16 occasions.

In practice, the path to get there is not nearly so simple. With a record of 33-37, in order for the Phils to reach 88 wins, they need to go 55-37 the rest of the way — and even that might not be enough. Nine times, or more than half, the runner-up’s win total actually eclipsed 88.

Murphy seems to be operating under the assumption the Phillies won’t win the NL East, a conclusion we’ve more or less drawn on our own. Regardless, sneaking in through the back door doesn’t diagram much easier.

The plan he sets out would require Cliff Lee, Cole Hamels, and Vance Worley to revert to their 2011 performances, when the club combined to go 39-17 over their last 56 combined starts. So far this season, the Phils are 11-3 when Hamels starts, but 7-14 when Lee or Worley are pitching. Lee and Worley have also missed games due to injury.

That’s an optimistic projection, though clearly achievable. Plus Roy Halladaywill eventually return, which should help prop up the rest of the rotation, and actually lessen the load on the other three.Yet you can see how staggering a hole the Phillies are in when you break it down like that. A team that has been hovering around or below .500 for the majority of the year likely needs to win at close to a .600 clip for the next three months — and they’re still missing players.

Think they have it in them?

———————————————————
Related Articles…

Philadelphia Phillies: How Chase Utley‘s Return Impacts Team’s Playoff Chances

By

 (Featured Columnist) on June 22, 2012

Picture25_crop_exact

The result of Thursday night’s Philadelphia Phillies game, a 4-1 loss to theColorado Rockies, pretty much sums up how the entire season has been going.

Citizen’s Bank Park, a place that boasts loud and passionate fans, used to be a place that other teams dreaded to play in. The home-field advantage was never more obvious than when the Phils took the field at their stadium in the heart of their beloved city. In 2012, however, it has just been a place where the Phillies play their home games. Nothing much is special about it, no added advantage is obvious. The team isn’t winning any more games at home. They aren’t winning games period.

Nothing has been easy for the Phils this season. Whether it has been the injuries to key members of the team, uncharacteristic errors in the field, a lack of success against other teams’ bullpens or just an inability to score with runners on base with less than two outs, the championship formula this team has had in the past few years is not there.

Morale is down and frustration is obvious. It is on the faces of the players, the dumbfounded looks of the manager and the disappointment from the fans.

This team needs something, well a lot of things. It needs to get help in the bullpen. It needs to get its ace and sluggers off of the DL. It needs its other ace to find a way to win a game. It needs to score more runs. It needs to make less errors, both mental and on the score sheet. It needs to take action, to play inspired baseball. Most importantly, this team needs to get its swagger, its confidence, its personality back.

Most of what the Phils need, most of what I described, is embodied in the heart and soul of one player. He is someone who doesn’t shy away from a challenge, someone who plays with grit and passion, someone who is a leader. He may have arthritic knees but that doesn’t change the fact that when healthy, he can really smack the cover off of a baseball.

Will Chase Utley’s return make the Phils a better team?

No, one player is not enough to solve their problems.Yes, Utley will help this team make up ground in the East.It depends on how his knees are for the rest of the season.Submit Vote vote to see results

If you haven’t figured it out, the person I am referring to is All-Star second baseman Chase Utley.

Having yet to face major league pitching and the wear and tear of major league fielding, Utley is close to making his 2012 debut. In fact, according to a recent report via AOL Sporting News, Utley could be back before the calendar turns to July.

While Utley’s return has been long anticipated, at this point in the season, one has to wonder if it will be enough or if the Phils have already dug themselves a hole too deep to climb out of.

Even then, a bigger question arises. When Utley comes back, how will he be? Will he go back to how he was pre-2011? Will he be able to play back-to-back games? Will his knees hold up for the rest of the season?

With all of these questions and so far, not enough information to create the answers, it is hard to predict how Utley’s return will impact the team’s chances at a sixth consecutive playoff berth. If Utley is healthy, however, and returns to the form he has had in the best years of his career, it would not be surprising to see the Phillies once again atop the NL East.

On the field, Utley brings solid defensive skills. He has never been perfect in the field but it is something he has invested time and energy in improving. With the bat, Utley has offensive prowess. His quick swing enables him to get the barrel on the ball and helps him get around on pitches. He grinds out each at-bat and is rarely ever an easy out.

144812412_crop_340x234
Rich Schultz/Getty Images

Something else that the Phillies desperately need is situational hitting and when at his best, Utley does this as well as anyone else in the game. With a runner on second, nobody out, such as in Thursday’s game when Ty Wigginton led off the inning with a double, Utley knows what he has to do and more often than not executes.

In addition to what Utley offers with his bat and his glove, depending on his knees, he can also be a threat on the bases. Although not the fastest, Utley has also had good career numbers in base stealing percentage. Just like every other aspect of his game, he works so hard at it and as a result, when he does run, he picks his moments, and more often than not, he chooses them wisely.

In the dugout, in the clubhouse, in the locker room and on the field, Chase Utley is a leader. For someone who keeps his life relatively under wraps in terms of the media, Utley has proven himself to be a vital part of who the team is. Much of the confidence, swagger and personality this team alludes comes from the way Utley plays the game. The younger players on the team imitate him and the older players respect him.

If Jimmy Rollins is the fire and Ryan Howard is the heart of the line up, Chase Utley is obviously the soul. Without its heart and soul, Rollins’ fire is just an extinguishing flame. It goes without saying that with Utley back, this team will start to get some of its morale back. Rollins’ flame, which has been starting to light up, will catch fire. Led by Rollins and Utley, the rest of this offense will catch fire too, just in time for a late playoff push in the heat of the summer months.

So even though the Chase Utley Phillies fans will see is still in question, what isn’t in question is what he means to this team. So much of Utley’s value is not measured in a box score. It is in the intangibles he exudes just when he takes the field. For the Phils, getting Utley back will impact their playoff chances and could very well make them a playoff team again.

No matter what, though, the Phillies will be an interesting story to watch as the final, pivotal months of the season are underway.

The Phillies Golden Age 2004 – 2012.. The Rise & Fall?

by bloggo schloggo aka charles oliver

A look into what we are witnessing as possibly the beginning of the end of what has to be considered historically as the Phillies finest 9 year run in their 130 years as a professional baseball club.

Philadelphia Phillies general manager Ruben Am...

Some may argue that the Phillies run over the course between 1975 and 1983 was an equal if not better 9 year period of prowess.

Of course you may also consider the world possibly ending in December according to the Mayan Calendar followers.

  • Philadelphia Phillies (8868-9890 W-L, 1890 – 2012) – 2 World Championships, 7 Pennants, and 14 Playoff Appearances
  • Philadelphia Quakers (390-424 W-L, 1883 – 1889)
  • Overall (9258-10314 W-L, 1883 – 2012) – 2 World Championships, 7 Pennants, and 14 Playoff Appearances
A comparison of the two 9 year periods –

2004-2012

Rk Year W L WL% Finish Playoffs R RA BatAge PitchAge Top Player Managers
1 2012 21 22 .488 5th of 5 172 169 31.3 30.0 C.Ruiz (2.0) Charlie Manuel (21-22)
2 2011 102 60 .630 1st of 5 Lost LDS (3-2) 713 529 31.4 29.2 C.Lee (8.8) Charlie Manuel (102-60)
3 2010 97 65 .599 1st of 5 Lost NLCS (4-2) 772 640 31.8 31.1 R.Halladay (8.1) Charlie Manuel (97-65)
4 2009 93 69 .574 1st of 5 Lost WS (4-2) 820 709 31.3 31.2 C.Utley (7.9) Charlie Manuel (93-69)
5 2008 92 70 .568 1st of 5 Won WS (4-1) 799 680 30.1 30.6 C.Utley (9.0) Charlie Manuel (92-70)
6 2007 89 73 .549 1st of 5 Lost LDS (3-0) 892 821 28.8 30.6 C.Utley (7.9) Charlie Manuel (89-73)
7 2006 85 77 .525 2nd of 5 865 812 29.3 30.5 C.Utley (6.8) Charlie Manuel (85-77)
8 2005 88 74 .543 2nd of 5 807 726 30.0 29.7 C.Utley (7.2) Charlie Manuel (88-74)
9 2004 86 76 .531 2nd of 5 840 781 29.3 29.8 B.Abreu (6.3) Larry Bowa (85-75)

1975 – 2012

Rk Year W L Ties W-L% Finish Playoffs R RA BatAge PitchAge Top Player Managers
30 1983 90 72 1 .556 1st of 6 Lost WS (4-1) 696 635 31.9 30.3 J.Denny (7.2) Corrales (43-42) & Owens (47-30)
31 1982 89 73 0 .549 2nd of 6 664 654 31.0 31.9 M.Schmidt (7.1) Pat Corrales (89-73)
32 1981 59 48 0 .551 3rd of 6 L LDS (3-2) 491 472 31.3 30.3 M.Schmidt (7.5) Dallas Green (59-48)
33 1980 91 71 0 .562 1st of 6 W WS (4-2) 728 639 30.6 28.6 S.Carlton (9.8) Dallas Green (91-71)
34 1979 84 78 1 .519 4th of 6 683 718 30.7 28.3 M.Schmidt (7.6) Ozark (65-67) & Green (19-11)
35 1978 90 72 0 .556 1st of 6 L NLCS (3-1) 708 586 29.9 30.3 M.Schmidt (6.0) Danny Ozark (90-72)
36 1977 101 61 0 .623 1st of 6 L NLCS (3-1) 847 668 29.4 29.7 M.Schmidt (8.7) Danny Ozark (101-61)
37 1976 101 61 0 .623 1st of 6 L NLCS (3-0) 770 557 28.8 29.8 M.Schmidt (7.9) Danny Ozark (101-61)
38 1975 86 76 0 .531 2nd of 6 735 694 27.7 27.3 M.Schmidt (7.4) Danny Ozark (86-76)
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 5/22/2012.

Philadelphia skyline.

Question Marks –

What fans have had in the back of their minds as this season continues to unfold are now becoming evermore present in the forefront and increasing in numbers. There is something in the air. It’s tangible and you can smell it. No it’s not the stink of the refineries wafting across the city. It is emanating from “The Bank”, Citizens Bank Park.

I watched Cliff Lee surrender 5 runs the other day and Roy Halladay do the same last night. Overall they weren’t bad efforts. Although not what you would expect from either starter. When you have a lineup that produces 0 – 3 runs most nights it is a problem. A major one at that. Cole Hamels suddenly is the go to guy that is pumping out consistent starts and victories.

Actually the Phils are batting well as a team hits and average wise. How many times have the Phils had two runners in scoring position with 0 to 2 outs and the innings ended with a big fat goose egg?

Batting Chart

It’s all about power. A miserable lack of it. It became glaringly clear toward the end of last season and after the team’s quick exit from the playoffs. It was obvious that this was the main issue that needed to be addressed in the off season. The Phils did take care of it – well sort of. The lack of power from the bench was given a boost with the acquisitons on veterans like Thome, Wiggington, Nix, etc. As far as the everyday lineup goes zilch was done.

If you’ll remember at the latter part of last season with the Phils whimpering to the finish line  (the 1st round of the playoffs defeat to the Cardinals) they did so with Utley and Howard in the lineup. Everyone is sitting on their hands waiting for the second coming believing Utley and Howard will be their saving grace. Will that be the case? One has to wonder with both players numbers waning. The timely hitting morphing into whiffs and groundout double plays. Scoring opportunities fizzling and rallies killed.

Charlie Manuel

Surely with Utley and Howard back in the daily mix the Phillies will be a better team. But how much better? Will it be enough to turn the season around? With the Braves, Nationals, Mets and Marlins all far improved and knocking on the NL East”s Division Champs door will the Phillies win 102 or 82 games?  When Utley returns how long will he remain healthy?   It’s a shame a guy that once looked to be a sure fire future Hall Of Famer has had his career basically turned upside down with injury upon injury.

With the Phillies fortunes currently on the wane the fans are starting to get a bit restless. Especially with poor play on the basepaths and runners left on base. How much longer will the teams 250+ sellout streak continue? Have you noticed a change in the sound of the crowd? The Phils Phaithful are smart and sharp. They know their baseball and how the game is supposed to be played. With the support of the fans attendance the dough has been rolling in to enable big names and big contracts to happen in Philly. What happens when the coffers start to dwindle? If things continue on the current course will the Phillies initiate a fire sale come mid-season and head into a new direction?

As with the game of life all things will be answered it’s all a matter of time and circumstances. With just 1/4 of the season gone anything is possible and anything can happen. Just ask the 2011 World Champion St’ Louis Cardinals.

“I’d love to change the world but I don’t know what to do. So I’ll leave it up to you.”  ~ Ten Years After 1969 

The Future From Within

Top 15 Prospects: Philadelphia Phillies

by Marc Hulet

The Philadelphia Phillies might not have a strong farm system, but it certainly is an intriguing one. Considering how much talent the organization had to give up to acquire the likes of Roy HalladayCliff Lee (the first time), Roy Oswalt and Hunter Pence, that’s an impressive accomplishment. And its perhaps even more impressive when you figure in the number of high draft picks the club has had to deal away to assemble its impact ensemble. Still, all those trades have definitely hurt this organization’s minor-league depth:

1. Trevor May, RHP
BORN: Sept. 23, 1989
EXPERIENCE: Four seasons
ACQUIRED: 2008 fourth round, Washington HS
2010-11 TOP 10 RANKING: Fifth

SCOUTING REPORT: May is a big, strong pitcher with a solid repertoire that includes a 90mph to 95 mph fastball. He also has a potentially plus curveball, a changeup and a new-found slider. His delivery gets out of whack at times, which causes his command to suffer. As a player from a cold-weather state, he’s always been a little behind prospects from sunny weather locales, such as California, Arizona and Florida — but he’s definitely playing catch-up now.

YEAR IN REVIEW: Brody Colvin took a step back in 2011, and Jarred Cosartwas traded to Houston, so May’s breakout season was more than welcomed by the organization. The right-hander pitched a career high 144.1 innings and had a 2.69 FIP. He maintained an outstanding strikeout rate (12.10 K/9), but his control remained inconsistent (4.05 BB/9) — and that is the biggest thing preventing him from becoming an elite pitcher.

YEAR AHEAD: May will move up to double-A in 2012 and he isn’t far from contributing to the big-league team. Still, he needs to polish his secondary pitches and improve his control.

CAREER OUTLOOK: May has the potential to develop into a No. 2 starter – especially if he commands his fastball at the major-league level. He has the frame to become an innings-eater.

2. Jesse Biddle, LHP
BORN: Oct. 22, 1991
EXPERIENCE: Two seasons
ACQUIRED: 2010 first round (27th overall), Pennsylvania HS
2010-11 TOP 10 RANKING: Eighth

SCOUTING REPORT: A Philadelphia native, Biddle changed his commitment to the University of Oregon and signed with his hometown team. So far, it appears that he made a smart decision. The lefty has the potential to develop into a No. 2 starter, especially with his solid two-pitch mix that includes a low-to-mid-90s fastball and potentially plus changeup. He’s also dabbled with both a curveball and a slider.

YEAR IN REVIEW: Biddle has a strong frame and he showed his durability by increasing his innings total from 2010 to 2011. His overall numbers would have looked even better if not for his slow start in April. He allowed 13 earned runs that month (16.1 IP) and, by comparison, just 14 in the season’s second half (66 IP).

YEAR AHEAD: If he has a breakout season, Biddle could challenge May for the organization’s top prospect in 2012. The southpaw should open the year in high-A ball but he could be in double-A by the beginning of July. The big things he needs to work on are his control and the development of a consistent breaking ball.

CAREER OUTLOOK: Biddle is an exciting young player and he’s a few improvements away from being one of the better pitching prospects in baseball. He could end up pitching near the top of the rotation before too long. The opportunity to watch — and potentially learn from — veterans Roy Halladay and Cliff Lee could make a big impact on his career.

3. Sebastian Valle, C
BORN: July 24, 1990
EXPERIENCE: Five seasons
ACQUIRED: 2006 international free agent
2010-11 TOP 10 RANKING: Sixth

SCOUTING REPORT: If he were a little more patient, Valle would probably be discussed among the Top three-to-five catching prospects in the game. Offensively, he flashes above-average power due to good bat speed, but he doesn’t always make contact with best pitches. Early in his career behind the plate, he struggled throwing out base runners — but he has improved immensely during the past two seasons. He calls a good game and he has strong receiving skills.

YEAR IN REVIEW: Valle had a decent year at high-A in 2011. He produced the second-highest batting average of his career at .284 (.360 BABIP), but his power dropped from .174 ISO in 2010 to .109 last season. His modest patience also took a step back (his walk rate fell from 5.6% to 3.6%). Valle might benefit from returning to high-A ball for the first month or two in 2012.

YEAR AHEAD: Valle didn’t hit well in the Mexican Winter League, so double-A may be a bit of a stiff test for his over-aggressive bat in 2012. Even so, he should reach the majors perhaps as quickly as the second half of 2013.

CAREER OUTLOOK: The Mexico native is definitely the Phillies’ backstop of the future and he should be able to offer at least as much value as current starter Carlos Ruiz. If Valle can’t get his impatient ways under control, though, he’ll likely fail to reach his full potential.

4. Brody Colvin, RHP
BORN: Aug. 14, 1990
EXPERIENCE: Three seasons
ACQUIRED: 2009 seventh round, Louisiana HS
2010-11 TOP 10 RANKING: Fourth

SCOUTING REPORT: When he’s on, Colvin shows that he has the makings of three average — or better — pitches. His fastball can reach 97 mph, but it often sits in the low-90s. He also features a curveball and a changeup. Colvin doesn’t have the smoothest mechanics and he throws across his body, which increases ball movement but hurts his control and also raises injury concerns.

YEAR IN REVIEW: Colvin battled injuries in 2011 and his numbers suffered. After pitching 138 innings in 2010, he managed just 116 in 2011. His strikeout rate also dropped – from 7.83 to 5.97.

YEAR AHEAD: Colvin could begin 2012 back in high-A ball. He has good stuff but he hasn’t dominated at any level. With improved command of his pitches, he could really break out – especially if he can shake the injury bug.

CAREER OUTLOOK: Colvin has yet to prove his durability, but he has the potential to develop into a No. 2 or No. 3 starter down the road. There has also been talk of trying to develop him into a high-leverage reliever. The likes of Trevor May and Jesse Biddlecould make that move more palatable.

5. Jon Pettibone, RHP
BORN: July 19, 1990
EXPERIENCE: Four seasons
ACQUIRED: 2008 third round, California HS
2010-11 TOP 10 RANKING: Off

SCOUTING REPORT: Pettibone is nowhere near as flashy as some of the other arms on this list, but he has the potential to develop into a No. 3 starter. He throws in the low 90s with his fastball but it can touch 94 mph. He also has a good changeup and a decent slider. His control is above-average for this stage of his development.

YEAR IN REVIEW: Pettibone produced some sparkling numbers at high-A ball in 2011, including a 2.92 FIP and a 1.90 BB/9. His strikeout rate, though, was low for the second consecutive season (6.43 K/9). He handled both right- and left-handed hitters equally well in 2011.

YEAR AHEAD: Pettibone should spend the year in double-A, although his above-average control gives him a chance to eventually reach triple-A in 2012 — and the major leagues some time in 2013. Further development of his secondary pitches will help him compete at the upper levels of the minors.

CAREER OUTLOOK: Although he can get some zip on his heater, Pettibone is more of a pitch-to-contact, control-type hurler. He has a big, strong frame to be an innings-eater and there is definitely room for him to improve as he learns to pitch off his fastball.

6. Maikel Franco, 3B
BORN: Aug. 26, 1992
EXPERIENCE: Two seasons
ACQUIRED: 2010 international free agent
2010-11 TOP 10 RANKING: Off

SCOUTING REPORT: The breakout hitting prospect of the year, Franco wasn’t on anyone’s radar entering the 2011 season. He showed a solid eye at the plate and displayed good power potential, although he’s still learning to drive the ball consistently. Franco doesn’t exactly have an athletic body but he plays the position well and has a strong arm.

YEAR IN REVIEW: Franco did not turn 19 until part way through 2011, making his numbers all that more impressive. He hit for average and for gap power in short-season ball, while also showing a solid eye at the plate (10.9 BB%). He didn’t perform well during a late-season promotion to low-A.

YEAR AHEAD: The third baseman will take another shot at low-A in 2012 and he should spend the entire season there working on driving the ball. The organization lacks third base depth so another strong year could increase Franco’s hype.

CAREER OUTLOOK: Franco has the potential to be at least average on both defense and at the plate. He will have to watch his conditioning, though, as he’s already thick through the trunk. He’ll also need to see his power translate from gap to over-the-fence power if he’s going to be an everyday player at the hot corner.

7.Jiwan James, OF
BORN: April 11, 1989
EXPERIENCE: Five seasons
ACQUIRED: 2007 22nd round, Florida HS
2010-11 TOP 10 RANKING: Seventh

SCOUTING REPORT: James has a lot of potential but the organization left him unprotected during this year’s Rule 5 draft and he went unclaimed. The outfielder has been hitting for just two seasons after originally turning pro as a pitcher. Injury woes, though, put an end to his time on the mound. James could develop into a three- or four-tool player with his power being the least developed skill. He has good defensive skills and base-running speed but both areas remain raw.

YEAR IN REVIEW: In just his third year as a hitter, James spent the season in high-A and held his own. The switch-hitter showed that he’s much stronger from the left side of the plate (.721 OPS vs .608 OPS in 2011) and the organization might want to abandon the switch-hitting to help accelerate his learning. As mentioned above, James has good speed but he  got nabbed 16 times in 47 stolen-base attempts.

YEAR AHEAD: Double-A will be a stiff test for James in 2012, as he’ll have to tone down his aggressive ways at the plate. He’ll likely needs a full year of development at double-A before moving up.

CAREER OUTLOOK: I’m more than a little surprised that no one took a chance on James in the Rule 5 draft but there are still a number of questions surrounding his game. If the organization is patient, though, he could develop into a valuable contributor in Philadelphia.

8. Phillippe Aumont, RHP
BORN: Jan. 7, 1989
EXPERIENCE: Four seasons
ACQUIRED: 2007 first round (11th overall), Quebec HS (near Seattle)
2010-11 TOP 10 RANKING: Off

SCOUTING REPORT: To say Aumont has had an up-and-down career is an understatement. A former Mariners’ first round pick, Aumont was the top prize when Philly traded for Cliff Lee. Originally a starter, Aumont was moved to bullpen permanently. The move allows him to focus on his two plus pitches: a mid-to-high-90s fastball and a curveball. Both his command and control need a fair bit of work.

YEAR IN REVIEW: Combined between two levels, Aumont struck out 78 batters in 53.2 innings — so that gives you a bit of an idea of how good he could be at the major-league level. Perhaps even more impressively, he allowed just two home runs all season and posted an outstanding ground-ball rate in double-A.

YEAR AHEAD: Aumont had solid numbers in both double-A and triple-A, giving him an outside shot of breaking camp with the Phillies in 2012. More likely than not, though, he’ll be given the opportunity to build up his confidence (and sharpen his command/control) with a few more months in the minors.

CAREER OUTLOOK: Aumont clearly has the stuff to close games someday, but it remains to be seen if he has the emotional fortitude to handle the role. At this point, I’m betting against that — but he’s still young and he has time to mature as a pitcher. At worst, he should have a Kyle Farnsworth-type career.

9. Justin De Fratus, RHP
BORN: Oct. 21, 1987
EXPERIENCE: Five seasons
ACQUIRED: 2007 11th round, California CC
2010-11 TOP 10 RANKING: Off

SCOUTING REPORT: Although not as high-profile as Aumont, De Fratus also benefited from a permanent move from the starting rotation to the bullpen. It caused his stuff to jump up a notch and he reached the majors in 2011. His repertoire includes a low-to-mid-90s fastball, a slider and an occasional changeup.

YEAR IN REVIEW: Like Aumont, De Fratus split his season between double-A and triple-A (while also pitching four innings in the majors). He struck out 99 batters in 75.1 cumulative minor-league innings. He also produced above-average ground-ball rates.

YEAR AHEAD: De Fratus has a very good opportunity to break camp with the Phillies in 2012 but he should be eased into late-game situations and might mostly see action in the sixth and seventh innings.

CAREER OUTLOOK: De Fratus is a big, strong pitcher who has been extremely durable to this point. He could have a lot of value in the Phillies ‘pen next year. He’ll likely top out as a high-leverage, eighth-inning reliever. No matter how you slice it, he was an exciting find while he was pitching for a small community college.

10. Larry Greene, OF
BORN: Feb. 10, 1993
EXPERIENCE: Prep
ACQUIRED: 2011 supplemental 1st round (39th overall), Georgia HS
2010-11 TOP 10 RANKING: NA

SCOUTING REPORT: The organization’s first pick in the 2011 draft (39th overall), Greene is a raw but powerful Georgia outfielder. There are some concerns about his bat speed but he hits massive home runs when he makes contact. He’s expected to produce a lot of strikeouts and not hit for much average — but he’s also still very young.

YEAR IN REVIEW: Greene signed too late to play pro ball in 2011.

YEAR AHEAD: The outfielder will likely open 2012 in extended spring training before heading to rookie ball in June. He will be a slow mover who could spend two years in short-season ball before hitting full-season A-ball in 2014.

CAREER OUTLOOK: Greene has the potential to develop into a 30-home run machince if he makes necesary adjustments and gets his bat started a little earlier. He likely won’t provide much defensive vale and he could end up moving to first base if he can’t hack it in left field.

The Next Five
11. Freddy Galvis, SS: I’m not a huge Galvis fan, but he has potential value as a young, switch-hitting infielder with a plus glove. His bat took a big step forward in 2011 and he hit for a more consistent average and showed more gap power.

12. Roman Quinn, SS/OF: The club’s second round pick, Quinn has 80 speed on the base paths. He’s learning to switch hit, which could increase his value as it will help him beat out even more infield hits. His ultimate position will also impact his overall value; he was an amateur shortstop but he’ll likely end up in center field.

13. Lisalberto Bonilla: The right-hander had a nice season and showed good control for his age. His repertoire features a low-90s fastball that can touch 94 mph. His second-best pitch is a changeup, followed by a developing slider. He could develop into a No. 3 or a No. 4 starter.

14. Julio Rodriguez, RHP: On numbers alone, Rodriguez looks like a very impressive prospect. He struck out 168 hitters in 156.2 high-A innings in 2011 but he succeeds on command and mixing his pitches. His fastball works in the upper 80s. Ultimately, he should top out as a back-of-the-rotation starter or as a middle reliever.

15. Aaron Altherr, OF: Altherr is a raw athlete who has an outside shot to develop into a 20-20 hitter. He’s too aggressive at the plate right now and he needs to learn better pitch selection. Defensively, he could become a plus fielder.

SLEEPER ALERTKyrell Hudson, OF: Hudson is another speedy, raw athlete. A former third-round pick in 2009, he has developed slowly. Still, he made significant strides in 2011 when compared to his two previous seasons. With that said, he still has a long way to go; and if he stagnates as a hitter, he has a plus arm that could turn him into a pitcher.

Dumb & Dumber- Meet Mr. Hamels

by Charles (Chuck) Oliver aka Bloggo Schloggo

DUMB…

Cole Hamels plunks rookie sensation Bryce Harper. It was the first each had faced each other. No history or animosity between them. Harper goes to first base. He immediately gets back at Hamels by catching the Phillies sleeping and goes all the way from first to third on a short single to the outfield. Then what does he do? Steals home while Hamels throws to first to keep the guy at first from getting a big lead and possibly steal second. That’s how you get even- by your performance on the field of play. Hamels isn’t “old school”, Harper is. The kid plays with the abandon of Pete Rose or Ty Cobb. That’s old school. Later in the game Hamels gets plunked in the leg to add insult to injury.

Cole Hamels pitching a complete game shutout v...

DUMBER…

Cole Hamels pitched a great 8 innings and promptly tells the press after the game he hit Harper intentionally. Duh really?

I had a lot of respect for Hamels before this dumb and dumber incident. I didn’t think for one minute he was throwing at Harper. I thought Hamels was attempting to throw inside and the ball got away from him. There was no reason to plunk Harper.

Let’s face it – all contact sports are under scrutiny as we learn more about concussions and the life long damage they can incur including brain damage, depression and even suicide,

Bryce Harper

As we learn more we change the rules of the game as we have witnesses especially in hockey and football. There is nothing wrong with rough play and hard contact in the course of a contest. Intentionally trying to injure a player is dead wrong. I’ve seen things happen on rinks, gridirons and diamonds that if they took place on the streets you would go to jail for those acts of violence. I’m talking felony assault and battery with intent to harm or injure. If you threw a rock or baseball at somebodies head at 90 mph and knocked them out you might find yourself facing attempted murder charges or assault with a deadly weapon.

We live and learn and as we do we make changes. Those changes are what we call progress. I can remember Roger Clemens intentionally beaning Mike Piazza and knocking him unconscious. He could have killed him. On another occasion he threw a bat at him. I wouldn’t mind seeing Clemens getting locked up for lying to congress under oath about his steroid use. He’s a bum as far as I’m concerned.

Roger Clemens pitching for the Houston Astros,...

There is enough violence in this world and it has no business on the field of play. What kind of message are we sending to our kids?

The wrap is that Hamels got a 5 day suspension which means he really won’t miss a start he’ll just be moved back a day. Also a fine I’m sure he can well afford.

He hurt the team no doubt about it. With the Phillies struggling as they are it’s the last thing they need. The Nationals are in first place and will meet the Phils about 15 or so more times this season. When they meet there will be pre-game warnings issued for sure. Hamels has succeeded in putting the entire pitching staff at a disadvantage. Do they alter their pitching so as not to pitch too far inside?

I believe Hamels wasn’t trying to injure Harper and I’m glad he didn’t throw at him above the shoulders. That being said hitting him in the back a little more to the left could have possibly caused a spinal injury. There is no place in baseball, a family friendly sport for 90 mph bean balls. That wasn’t the case here. But in future meetings things could get ugly and the last thing we need is a bean ball war. If you want to prove yourself do it by excelling on the field the old fashioned way with hard work, hustle and talent.

I love the Phillies and love watching Cole Hamels pitching one of his gems and will continue to do so. It’s time for the Phils and Hamels to get the house in order and concentrate on winning ball games and reclaiming their rightful place at the top of their division.

ONE MORE NOTE…

The Phillies bonehead move in the off season was letting Wilson Valdez go. Sure Freddy Galvis is a pretty good defensive player but sporting the .180 batting average he has is strictly minor league material. The guy has been nothing less than a rally killer. Valdez is a money player that is a clutch hitter and can play 2nd, shortstop and 3rd. Even pitch in a pinch. The Phils probably would have 2 or 3 wins more with Valdez. Dumb move Amaro.

Updated 1-Month MLB Power Rankings: Where Does Your Favorite Team Stand?

Where does your favorite MLB team stand after the season’s first month?

By Joel Reuter (Featured Columnist) on BLEACHER REPORT

ARLINGTON, TX - APRIL 23:  Josh Hamilton #32 of the Texas Rangers at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington on April 23, 2012 in Arlington, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

 Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

1: Texas Rangers (16-6, Previous: 1)

Despite their worst week of the season so far, the Rangers maintain the top spot after taking two of three from the Yankees, then dropping two of three to the Rays.

Josh Hamilton (.395 BA, 9 HR, 25 RBI) continues to be the AL version of Matt Kemp, while the rest of the offense is doing its part as well with five other players tallying double-digit RBI. The Rays proved the Rangers are human, but there is still little question that the Rangers are the best team in baseball right now.

2: Tampa Bay Rays (14-8, Previous: 8)

It was a fantastic week for the Rays as they swept the Angels at home before going to Texas and taking two of three from a Rangers team that was undeniably the best team in baseball going into the week.

While the Rangers still get the nod over the Rays here, there is a lot to like about the Rays. From a deep offense that is light years better than last season to their immensely talented pitching staff, they could certainly challenge the Rangers for the top spot in the near future.

3: St. Louis Cardinals (14-8, Previous: 2)

After dropping two of three to the rival Cubs in Chicago, the Cardinals took two of three from the Brewers at home to maintain a three-game lead in the NL Central.

The starting pitching outside of Adam Wainwright (7.32 ERA) has been phenomenal, and David Freese (.333 BA, 5 HR, 20 RBI) continues to carry an offense that has gotten consistent contribution up and down the lineup.

4: Los Angeles Dodgers (16-6, Previous: 6)

Matt Kemp

Matt Kemp

The Dodgers dropped two of three to the Braves to open the week, but bounced back to sweep a good Nationals team for a 4-2 week that kept them atop the NL West and gave them the NL’s best record.

The offense has consisted almost exclusively of Matt Kemp (.425 BA, 11 HR, 24 RBI) and Andre Ethier (.277 BA, 5 HR, 24 RBI). While they have been great, the rest of the team needs to start hitting around them. Of note, Ted Lilly is very quietly 2-0 with a 0.90 ERA through three starts.

5: Atlanta Braves (14-8, Previous: 7)

A 4-2 week pulled the Braves even with the Nationals atop the NL East, as they took two of three from a good Dodgers team and finished up a series victory over the Pirates with a win on Sunday.

The team pulled a shocker of sorts when they sent 2011 All-Star Jair Jurrjens (9.37 ERA) down to Triple-A, but the move corresponded with Tim Hudson coming off the disabled list, so the team should be fine in the short term. They are off to a good start, but there is a ton of room for improvement across the board in Atlanta.

6: Washington Nationals (14-8, Previous: 4)

The difference between the No. 3 spot and the No. 7 spot on this list is minimal, but a four-game losing streak left them at 2-4 on the week, and they fall a bit because of it.

That said, I am still very much a believer in the Nationals, as their pitching (2.33 team ERA) is going to keep them in most games. The call-up of Bryce Harper should allow the Nationals to get some much-deserved national attention, and also gives them a boost not many teams can find in their farm system.

7: Baltimore Orioles (14-8, Previous: 16)

After skeptically inching them up the rankings the past few weeks, I will officially admit I am now drinking the Orioles’ Kool-aid, as a 5-1 week that included a sweep of the Blue Jays has put them in first place in the AL East.

With an offense that ranks 10th in runs scored and a pitching staff that ranks seventh in ERA, they are doing everything well right now. Five players have double-digit RBI, and J.J. Hardy (.181 BA) and Nick Markakis (.244 BA) are not among them. Once those two get going, the Orioles could be even better.

8: New York Yankees (12-9, Previous: 5)

The Yankees had a tough week on the schedule as they opened the week dropping two of three to the Rangers before taking two of three from the Tigers for a respectable 3-3 showing.

However, they drop on this list due to the news that Michael Pineda is done for the year with a shoulder injury. With Phil Hughes (7.88 ERA) and Ivan Nova (5.18 ERA) struggling and Freddy Garcia (12.51 ERA) moved to the bullpen in favor of untested David Phelps, the rotation is once again a huge question mark.

9: Detroit Tigers (11-11, Previous: 3)

It was a tough week for the Tigers, as they were swept by the Mariners and then dropped two of three to the Yankees as they nearly doubled their loss total with a 1-5 week.

On top of that, they released long-time Tiger Brandon Inge and lost Delmon Young indefinitely after he was arrested and charged with hate-crime harassment. They will look to get things back on track against the Royals and White Sox this coming week, and they still have to be considered among the AL favorites despite this hiccup.

10: Toronto Blue Jays (12-10, Previous: 9)

The Blue Jays completed a four-game sweep of the Royals on Monday before turning around and being swept themselves by the Orioles. They then took two of three from the Mariners for a 3-4 week.

Edwin Encarnacion (.310 BA, 7 HR, 20 RBI) is 5-for-9 with three home runs and seven RBI in his last three games, and he’s been moved to the cleanup spot in hopes of better protecting Jose Bautista. The real story, though, has been their starting pitching, as four of their five starters have ERAs under 4.00.

11: New York Mets (13-9, Previous: 14)

It was a busy week for the Mets, as they played eight games in seven days and at the end of it all walked away with a 5-3 record, including a sweep of the Marlins mid-week.

They’ll be getting center fielder Andres Torres back from injury on Monday, shifting rookie Kirk Nieuwenhuis to left field as the lineup should be improved moving forward. As long as their pitching staff—especially the starters—keeps performing like they have, the Mets are on track to do much better than expected.

12: San Francisco Giants (12-10, Previous: 12)

The Giants dropped two of three to the Reds to open the week, but salvaged things by taking two of three from the lowly Padres for a 3-3 finish.

Buster Posey (.353 BA, 4 HR, 9 RBI) has bounced back great from his injury last season, but the offense is still struggling to score runs. The biggest stat of the week for the Giants, though, was Tim Lincecum’s eight-inning, zero-run outing as he is back on track after a horrible start.

13: Arizona Diamondbacks (11-11, Previous: 10)

After losing two of three to the Phillies to open the week, the Diamondbacks managed to finish 3-3 in taking two of three from the struggling Marlins.

The team finally had enough of Josh Collmenter’s struggles (9.82 ERA), moving him to the bullpen and calling up their No. 8 prospect Patrick Corbin (1.67 ERA, 27 IP at Double-A) to make his big league debut. As long as they can consistently score runs, they should be able to find a rotation that works with perhaps the youngest starting pitching depth in baseball.

14: Boston Red Sox (10-11, Previous: 23)

After plummeting from 12th to 23rd in the rankings last week, the Red Sox seem to have righted the ship as they went 6-1 this week, sweeping the Twins before taking three of four from the White Sox.

Led by David Ortiz (.395 BA, 4 HR, 18 RBI), their offense has been solid despite a slow start from Kevin Youkilis and the absence of Carl Crawford and Jacoby Ellsbury. Their pitching continues to be a question mark, but as long as they continue to post double-digit run totals like they did three times last week they’ll win games.

15: Cincinnati Reds (11-11, Previous: 20)

The Reds moved to second in the NL Central with a 4-2 week, as they captured two of three from both the Giants and Astros.

Jay Bruce (.296 BA, 7 HR, 17 RBI) is on fire right now, as the highly touted offense is finally performing up to expectations. Now if only the notoriously slow-starting Mat Latos (5.97 ERA) can start paying dividends, they’d be in pretty good shape.

16: Philadelphia Phillies (10-12, Previous: 11)

My feeling early on was that the Phillies’ pitching would be enough to outweigh their aging and injury-riddled lineup, but another subpar 3-3 week in which they dropped two of three to the Cubs again showed the holes in their roster.

The unexpected trio of Carlos Ruiz, Juan Pierre and Ty Wigginton are the only everyday players with averages over .253, and Hunter Pence is the only player with double-digit RBI at 11. Kyle Kendrick has struggled filling in for the injured Cliff Lee, and all-in-all things just don’t look great in Philly right now.

17: Cleveland Indians (11-9, Previous: 18)

A rough week from the Tigers and a 3-3 showing by the Indians has put Cleveland in first place in the AL Central, as they dropped two of three to the lowly Royals before salvaging the week in taking two of three from the struggling Angels.

The starting pitching has been hit-or-miss, and the offense has no true standout player at this point, but they continue to win games. In what looks to be a wide-open AL Central, they should be able to stay in contention if nothing else.

18: Milwaukee Brewers (10-12, Previous: 15)

The Brewers stayed in the division last week, taking two of three from the Astros before dropping two of three to the Cardinals in St. Louis.

There is little doubt that the team misses Prince Fielder’s bat, and the struggles of Rickie Weeks (.193 BA) and Aramis Ramirez (.228 BA) have only magnified the loss. Their pitching staff may be a bigger concern, though, as Randy Wolf (7.17 ERA) and Yovani Gallardo (6.08 ERA) have struggled mightily.

19: Chicago White Sox (11-11, Previous: 17)

Last week, I was torn apart in the comments section for only moving the White Sox up one spot after a 4-1 week, my reasoning being I wasn’t sold on them just yet. Now, after a 2-5 week I can’t help saying I told you so.

That said, the White Sox have been better than expected, led by Paul Konerko (.383 BA, 5 HR, 15 RBI) and Jake Peavy (3-1, 1.67 ERA), and their solid start could be enough to delay what was expected to be a full-blown rebuilding season.

20: Seattle Mariners (11-12, Previous: 25)

The Mariners swept the Tigers in Detroit to open the week before dropping two of three to the Blue Jays at home, but they have to be happy with a 4-2 week against two of the league’s top teams.

They tallied 30 runs in their four wins and just two in their two losses, and that is how their season will go as they have the pitching to compete but will only be as good as their offense allows them.

21: Los Angeles Angels (7-15, Previous: 13)

After giving them the benefit of the doubt through the first three weeks of the season, a 1-5 week and a the third-worst record in the American League simply can’t be overlooked. The Angels were swept by the Rays and dropped two of three to the Indians, ekeing out a 2-1 win on Saturday.

The call-up of uber-prospect Mike Trout, who was hitting .403 in Triple-A, could be the spark the team needs to get things going. A hot streak by Albert Pujols (.216 BA, 0 HR, 4 RBI) certainly wouldn’t hurt either.

22: Colorado Rockies (10-11, Previous: 19)

A 2-4 week saw the Rockies drop two of three to the Pirates and Mets, although they did explode for 18 runs on Friday in a victory over the Mets.

They acquired a good deal of starting pitching depth in the offseason, and they are already dipping into it as former A’s starter Guillermo Moscoso was called up with Jeremy Guthrie on the disabled list. The rotation has undoubtedly been their weakness to this point, with just one starter (Jamie Moyer, 3.14) with an ERA under 4.00.

23: Oakland Athletics (11-12, Previous: 21)

The A’s took two of three from the White Sox before dropping two of three to the Orioles, as they have struggled to find any consistency so far this season.

Despite having the worst team batting average in all of baseball at .205, the A’s have managed to stay competitive thanks to their pitching staff. Jarrod Parker (6.1 IP, 1 ER, 5 Ks) could make them even better after looking strong in his first start. Now they just need to find someone who can hit the ball.

24: Pittsburgh Pirates (9-12, Previous: 24)

The Pirates took two of three from the Rockies to open the week, then dropped two of three to the Braves in Atlanta as they held on to fourth place in the NL Central.

They continue to score runs at an alarmingly low pace, with just 49 through 21 games, but their pitching has been fantastic—their 2.77 team ERA thanks ranks third in all of baseball.

25: Chicago Cubs (8-14, Previous: 29)

The Cubs are in the midst of their best stretch of the season thus far, as they took two of three from the rival Cardinals to open the week and completed a 4-2 week with a victory over the Phillies on Sunday.

Tony Campana (.435 BA, 6 SB, 6 R) has provided a spark, taking over in center field for the departed Marlon Byrd, and the starting rotation has impressed, with Matt Garza throwing seven innings of one-hit ball to cap the week.

26: Miami Marlins (8-13, Previous: 22)

A sweep at the hands of the Mets opened the Marlins’ week, and they dropped two of three to the Diamondbacks to close things out, as a 1-5 week dropped them to last place in the NL East.

So far, the team has been perhaps the biggest disappointment in all of baseball. It starts with their superstars as Jose Reyes and Hanley Ramirez are both hitting .205, while Josh Johnson sports a 5.34 ERA.

27: Houston Astros (8-14, Previous: 26)

The Astros managed a 2-4 week on the road, taking one game each from the Reds and Brewers as they dropped to last place in the NL Central.

The offense has been solid, led by Jose Altuve (.373 BA) and J.D. Martinez (19 RBI), but the team desperately needs someone in the rotation to step up alongside Wandy Rodriguez (2-2, 1.72 ERA).

28: San Diego Padres (7-16, Previous: 28)

The Padres had a tough draw this week, facing the Nationals and Giants as they managed to win one game in each series for a 2-4 week.

Their pitching is starting to come around, and their bullpen has been terrific, but that doesn’t mean much when they’re not scoring runs. Chris Denorfia (team-high .282 average) has moved into a starting spot in left field, but it’s going to take a lot more than that for the Padres to turn things around.

29: Kansas City Royals (6-15, Previous: 30)

Two losses to open the week pushed the Royals’ losing streak to 12 games, but they rallied to take the final two games of their series with the Indians before splitting two games with the Twins for a modest 3-3 week.

However, they are still 0-10 at home on the season.

Alex Gordon (.232 BA, 4 HR, 10 RBI) has begun to turn things around after moving out of the leadoff spot in the order, and if Eric Hosmer (.188 BA, 5 HR, 13 RBI) could follow suit it would go a long way toward helping the Royals at least find some consistency.

30: Minnesota Twins (6-15, Previous: 27)

With a win over the Royals on Sunday, the Twins managed to snap a six-game losing streak, as they were swept by the Red Sox to start the week before dropping one of two to the Royals for a 1-4 week.

Josh Willingham (.353 BA, 5 HR, 15 RBI) remains the team’s offensive leader, while Joe Mauer (.325 BA, 1 HR, 13 RBI) continues to show he is finally healthy. However, they may have the worst pitching staff in baseball, and that will continue to keep them near the bottom of the rankings.

Phils By The Numbers Through April 26

2012 Philadelphia Phillies   Batting, Pitching, & Fielding Statistics

9-10, 4th place in NL East (Schedule and Results)
View League Standings and Leaders

Manager: Charlie Manuel (9-10)
Scored 63 runs, Allowed 62 runs. Pythagorean W-L: 10-9

Ballparks: Citizens Bank Park · Attendance: 272,692 (1st of 16)
Park Factors  Over 100 favors batters, under 100 favors pitchers.
multi-year: 
Batting – 103, Pitching – 101 · one-year: Batting – 107, Pitching – 107

Carlos Ruiz

Carlos Ruiz

BATTING

Rk Pos AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG
1 C Carlos Ruiz 53 6 16 3 0 2 5 0 3 6 .302 .328 .472
2 1B Ty Wigginton 46 8 14 3 0 1 6 0 5 11 .304 .365 .435
3 2B Freddy Galvis# 60 4 12 4 0 1 5 0 3 10 .200 .238 .317
4 SS Jimmy Rollins# 70 8 16 2 0 0 3 4 4 15 .229 .267 .257
5 3B Placido Polanco 59 6 14 2 0 0 2 0 4 7 .237 .297 .271
6 LF Juan Pierre* 59 6 20 0 1 0 4 3 2 2 .339 .361 .373
7 CF Shane Victorino# 75 10 19 1 0 4 8 6 6 9 .253 .309 .427
8 RF Hunter Pence 71 10 19 2 0 3 11 2 4 18 .268 .316 .423
Rk Pos AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG
9 UT John Mayberry 45 0 9 2 0 0 2 0 0 14 .200 .200 .244
10 UT Laynce Nix* 23 3 8 4 0 1 6 0 2 7 .348 .400 .652
11 1B Jim Thome* 17 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 10 .118 .211 .118
12 C Brian Schneider* 15 1 4 0 0 0 1 0 1 3 .267 .313 .267
13 2B Pete Orr* 15 1 4 2 1 0 3 0 0 4 .267 .267 .533
Rk Pos AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG
14 P Roy Halladay 11 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 5 .273 .273 .273
15 P Cole Hamels* 10 0 3 1 0 0 2 0 0 3 .300 .300 .400
16 P Vance Worley 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 .000 .000 .000
17 P Cliff Lee* 6 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 .333 .333 .333
18 P Joe Blanton 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 .000 .200 .000
19 P Kyle Kendrick 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 .000 .000 .000
20 P David Herndon 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 .000 .000 .000
21 P Michael Stutes 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
22 P Joe Savery* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
23 P Antonio Bastardo 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
24 P Chad Qualls 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
25 P Michael Schwimer 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
26 P Jose Contreras 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
27 P Jonathan Papelbon 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Team Totals 650 63 165 26 2 12 59 15 37 132 .254 .294 .355
Rank in 16 NL teams 5 14 5 15 13 11 4 15 10 6 14 12
Rk Pos AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG
Cliff Lee pitching for the first time as a mem...

Cliff Lee

PITCHING

Rk Pos W L W-L% ERA G SV IP H ER BB SO WHIP BB/9 SO/9
1 SP Roy Halladay 3 1 .750 1.50 4 0 30.0 19 5 8 19 0.900 2.4 5.7
2 SP Cole Hamels* 3 1 .750 2.73 4 0 26.1 24 8 3 30 1.025 1.0 10.3
3 SP Vance Worley 2 1 .667 2.16 4 0 25.0 22 6 9 27 1.240 3.2 9.7
4 SP Cliff Lee* 0 1 .000 1.96 3 0 23.0 14 5 2 18 0.696 0.8 7.0
5 SP Joe Blanton 1 3 .250 4.34 4 0 18.2 23 9 3 7 1.393 1.4 3.4
Rk Pos W L W-L% ERA G SV IP H ER BB SO WHIP BB/9 SO/9
6 CL Jonathan Papelbon 0 0 1.13 8 6 8.0 6 1 2 7 1.000 2.3 7.9
7 RP Kyle Kendrick 0 1 .000 9.39 5 0 7.2 15 8 4 3 2.478 4.7 3.5
8 RP Chad Qualls 0 0 1.29 7 0 7.0 4 1 2 4 0.857 2.6 5.1
9 RP Michael Stutes 0 0 6.35 6 0 5.2 7 4 4 5 1.941 6.4 7.9
10 RP Antonio Bastardo* 0 1 .000 3.86 5 0 2.1 3 1 2 5 2.143 7.7 19.3
Rk Pos W L W-L% ERA G SV IP H ER BB SO WHIP BB/9 SO/9
11 Joe Savery* 0 0 1.59 4 0 5.2 2 1 1 1 0.529 1.6 1.6
12 David Herndon 0 1 .000 3.18 4 0 5.2 7 2 1 7 1.412 1.6 11.1
13 Jose Contreras 0 0 10.13 3 0 2.2 4 3 2 2 2.250 6.8 6.8
14 Michael Schwimer 0 0 0.00 1 0 1.0 0 0 0 0 0.000 0.0 0.0
Team Totals 9 10 .474 2.88 19 6 168.2 150 54 43 135 1.144 2.3 7.2
Rank in 16 NL teams 7 5 4 6 8 7 4 2 10
Rk Pos W L W-L% ERA G SV IP H ER BB SO WHIP BB/9 SO/9

Field view from the 300 level 03:28, 11 March ...

FIELDING

G Ch PO A E DP Fld% RF/9 RF/G PB WP CS PO Pos. Summary
Antonio Bastardo 5 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 0.00 0 0 P
Joe Blanton 4 6 1 4 1 0 .833 2.41 1.25 2 0 P
Jose Contreras 3 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 0.00 0 0 P
Freddy Galvis 19 99 30 68 1 14 .990 5.74 4.67 2B-SS
Roy Halladay 4 5 3 2 0 0 1.000 1.50 1.25 0 0 P
Cole Hamels 4 8 2 5 1 0 .875 2.39 1.75 3 2 P
David Herndon 4 2 1 1 0 0 1.000 3.18 0.50 0 0 P
Kyle Kendrick 5 1 0 1 0 0 1.000 1.17 0.20 0 0 P
Cliff Lee 3 2 1 1 0 1 1.000 0.78 0.67 0 0 P
John Mayberry 17 48 46 2 0 3 1.000 4.55 2.82 LF-1B-RF
Laynce Nix 7 50 46 3 1 6 .980 9.59 6.13 1B-LF
Pete Orr 4 14 3 10 1 2 .929 4.81 3.25 2B
Jonathan Papelbon 8 3 1 2 0 0 1.000 3.38 0.38 0 0 P
Hunter Pence 18 29 29 0 0 0 1.000 1.62 1.61 RF
Juan Pierre 14 18 18 0 0 0 1.000 1.53 1.29 LF
Placido Polanco 17 43 11 32 0 2 1.000 2.95 2.53 3B
Chad Qualls 7 2 1 1 0 0 1.000 2.57 0.29 0 0 P
Jimmy Rollins 19 73 23 49 1 15 .986 4.07 3.79 SS
Carlos Ruiz 17 118 107 11 0 2 1.000 8.19 6.94 1 1 6 0 C
Joe Savery 4 1 0 0 1 0 .000 0.00 0.00 0 0 P
Brian Schneider 5 36 30 6 0 0 1.000 8.31 7.20 0 1 1 0 C
Michael Schwimer 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 0.00 0 0 P
Michael Stutes 6 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 0.00 0 0 P
Jim Thome 3 32 29 2 1 3 .969 12.13 10.33 1B
Shane Victorino 19 44 43 1 0 1 1.000 2.35 2.32 CF
Ty Wigginton 15 94 79 13 2 9 .979 7.35 5.11 1B-3B
Vance Worley 4 8 2 6 0 1 1.000 2.88 2.00 2 0 P
Team Totals 19 736 506 220 10 59 .986 4.30 3.00 1 2 7 2
Rank in 16 NL teams 14 3 1
G Ch PO A E DP Fld% RF/9 RF/G PB WP CS PO Pos. Summary

Win Probability

PA BtRuns BtWins Plays WPA WPA+ WPA- WPA/LI Clutch REW boLI RE24/boLI PHlev
Joe Blanton 6 -0.8 -0.1 6 -0.1 0.0 -0.1 -0.1 0.0 -0.1 0.76 -1.0
Freddy Galvis# 65 -4.1 -0.4 65 -0.5 0.8 -1.3 -0.5 -0.0 -0.5 1.01 -4.9
Roy Halladay 12 -0.8 -0.1 12 -0.0 0.1 -0.2 -0.0 0.0 -0.1 1.00 -0.6
Cole Hamels* 11 -0.1 -0.0 11 0.0 0.1 -0.1 -0.0 0.0 0.1 0.84 -0.1
David Herndon 1 -0.3 -0.0 1 -0.0 0.0 -0.0 -0.0 -0.0 -0.0 0.86 -0.3
Kyle Kendrick 1 -0.3 -0.0 1 -0.0 0.0 -0.0 -0.0 -0.0 -0.0 1.17 -0.3
Cliff Lee* 7 -0.2 -0.0 8 -0.1 0.1 -0.1 -0.0 -0.0 -0.0 0.76 -0.2
John Mayberry 45 -4.9 -0.5 45 -0.6 0.4 -1.0 -0.6 -0.1 -0.7 1.01 -5.6 1.09
Laynce Nix* 25 2.7 0.3 25 0.0 0.6 -0.6 0.2 -0.1 0.2 1.03 2.0 1.21
Pete Orr* 15 0.2 0.0 15 -0.1 0.1 -0.2 -0.1 0.0 0.1 0.93 -0.0 0.11
Hunter Pence 76 -0.2 -0.0 78 0.2 1.6 -1.3 -0.0 0.3 -0.0 1.00 -0.6
Juan Pierre* 61 -0.1 -0.0 69 0.2 1.1 -0.9 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.94 0.4 0.86
Placido Polanco 65 -3.4 -0.3 66 -0.2 0.7 -0.9 -0.2 -0.0 -0.0 0.87 -1.0 0.61
Jimmy Rollins# 76 -5.3 -0.5 85 -0.1 1.0 -1.2 -0.3 0.2 -0.3 0.94 -3.6
Carlos Ruiz 58 1.3 0.1 59 -0.2 0.6 -0.9 0.0 -0.3 -0.2 0.98 -0.4 0.26
Brian Schneider* 16 -0.8 -0.1 16 -0.2 0.2 -0.4 -0.1 -0.0 -0.1 1.08 -1.3
Jim Thome* 19 -2.5 -0.3 19 -0.5 0.1 -0.7 -0.3 -0.2 -0.4 0.99 -2.6 1.59
Shane Victorino# 82 -0.4 -0.0 87 -0.0 1.1 -1.1 0.2 -0.2 0.2 0.95 1.0
Ty Wigginton 52 1.5 0.2 52 -0.0 0.7 -0.7 0.1 -0.1 0.4 0.89 1.2 0.97
Vance Worley 9 -2.5 -0.3 9 -0.2 0.0 -0.2 -0.2 0.0 -0.2 0.73 -2.3
League Average
Team Total 702 -20.9 -2.2 729 -2.4 9.5 -11.9 -2.0 -0.5 -1.4 0.95 -20.5 1.12
PA BtRuns BtWins Plays WPA WPA+ WPA- WPA/LI Clutch REW boLI RE24/boLI PHlev

Team Batting Ratios

Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 4/27/2012.
PA HR% SO% BB% XBH% X/H% SO/BB AB/SO AB/HR AB/RBI GB/FB GO/AO
Joe Blanton 6 0.0% 16.7% 16.7% 0.0% 1.00 4.0
Freddy Galvis# 65 1.5% 15.4% 4.6% 7.7% 42% 3.33 6.0 60.0 12.0 0.68 1.32
Roy Halladay 12 0.0% 41.7% 0.0% 0.0% 0% 2.2 11.0 2.00
Cole Hamels* 11 0.0% 27.3% 0.0% 9.1% 33% 3.3 5.0 1.33 4.00
David Herndon 1 0.0% 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 1.0
Kyle Kendrick 1 0.0% 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 1.0
Cliff Lee* 7 0.0% 14.3% 0.0% 0.0% 0% 6.0 0.25 1.00
John Mayberry 45 0.0% 31.1% 0.0% 4.4% 22% 3.2 22.5 0.72 0.71
Laynce Nix* 25 4.0% 28.0% 8.0% 20.0% 63% 3.50 3.3 23.0 3.8 0.67 2.33
Pete Orr* 15 0.0% 26.7% 0.0% 20.0% 75% 3.8 5.0 1.20 2.50
Hunter Pence 76 4.0% 23.7% 5.3% 6.6% 26% 4.50 3.9 23.7 6.5 1.30 1.64
Juan Pierre* 61 0.0% 3.3% 3.3% 1.6% 5% 1.00 29.5 14.8 1.20 1.85
Placido Polanco 65 0.0% 10.8% 6.2% 3.1% 14% 1.75 8.4 29.5 1.00 1.38
Jimmy Rollins# 76 0.0% 19.7% 5.3% 2.6% 13% 3.75 4.7 23.3 0.83 1.00
Carlos Ruiz 58 3.5% 10.3% 5.2% 8.6% 31% 2.00 8.8 26.5 10.6 0.81 1.27
Brian Schneider* 16 0.0% 18.8% 6.3% 0.0% 0% 3.00 5.0 15.0 1.00 1.50
Jim Thome* 19 0.0% 52.6% 10.5% 0.0% 0% 5.00 1.7 0.75 0.67
Shane Victorino# 82 4.9% 11.0% 7.3% 6.1% 26% 1.50 8.3 18.8 9.4 0.67 0.92
Ty Wigginton 52 1.9% 21.2% 9.6% 7.7% 29% 2.20 4.2 46.0 7.7 0.71 0.57
Vance Worley 9 0.0% 44.4% 0.0% 0.0% 2.3
League Average 2.2% 19.8% 8.3% 7.2% 33% 2.37 4.5 40.8 8.9 0.87 1.19
Team Total 702 1.7% 18.8% 5.3% 5.7% 24% 3.57 4.9 54.2 11.0 0.90 1.29
PA HR% SO% BB% XBH% X/H% SO/BB AB/SO AB/HR AB/RBI GB/FB GO/AO
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 4/27/2012.

1 Year, $15 Million For Hamels

Hamels agrees to $15M deal, avoids arbitration

Phils remain interested in working out long-term contract with lefty

By Todd Zolecki / MLB.com

PHILADELPHIA — Consider this a placeholder for something potentially bigger.

The Phillies and Cole Hamels on Tuesday agreed to a one-year, $15 million contract, which allowed them to avoid salary arbitration. The deal also allows them to focus on a possible multiyear extension before Hamels becomes a free agent following the 2012 season.

Cole Hamels pitching a complete game shutout v...

“We have cost certainty and the player has cost certainty,” general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. said. “Now we can go from there. This doesn’t preclude us from doing a long-term deal. We can negotiate with Cole from today through the end of November, and then beyond that to get a multiyear deal done. Just because we have a one-year deal in place doesn’t mean we can’t do something long term. As far as Cole beyond 2012, that’s something that’s still very much open for discussion.”

Hamels is line for a major payday, but how large remains to be seen. But think Cliff Lee more than Jered Weaver.

Weaver signed a five-year, $85 million contract extension last summer with the Los Angeles Angels, but Weaver bypassed free agency partly because he wanted to stay in Southern California and play for his hometown team. Weaver and Hamels have remarkably similar career statistics, so it is easy to think Hamels might be paid in that range: Hamels is 77-54 with a 3.39 ERA in 181 career appearances. He has a 1.141 WHIP and averages 8.5 strikeouts per nine innings. Weaver is 82-47 with a 3.31 ERA in 171 career appearances. He has a 1.165 WHIP and averages 7.8 strikeouts per nine innings.

But John Boggs, Hamels’ agent, on Tuesday called the Weaver deal a “non-starter” in negotiations.

Cole Hamels 20:52, 16 November 2007 . . Old ma...

“It would be natural to look at that as a comparison,” Boggs said. “Jered signed for his own personal reasons — and I applaud him for that — but it doesn’t necessarily mean we’re going to follow the same standard. Everybody is different. For Jered to sign there, it doesn’t mean that’s the template we’re going to follow.”

Lee signed a five-year, $120 million contract with the Phils in December 2010. That certainly seems to be a better measuring stick for Hamels.

“Absolutely,” Boggs said. “If you’re this close to free agency, you start to make comparables of what you have the potential of making as a free agent.”

Lee signed his deal at 32. Hamels is 28. It stands to reason Hamels will be looking for a contract worth $20 million or more per season.

But there is genuine interest on both sides to reach an agreement. Finalizing Hamels’ 2012 contract could be the first step.

“The goal was to get that out of the way,” Boggs said. “I’m sure down the road we’ll have a conversation about moving forward. We plan on keeping the discussions open. It’s a process.”

Boggs said he hasn’t talked to Hamels about setting any potential deadline regarding negotiations, which some players have done in the past.

“At the end of the day, we really don’t have any concrete game plan as far as how long we are going to plan on discussing this,” Boggs said. “That will be decided at some point shortly, or as we get into the process. But there’s definitely a desire to stay. At the end of the day, it really depends on the value we place on Cole, and hopefully it coincides with the value the Phillies place on Cole. That’s the reason you have a negotiation. From a basic desire, yes, he’d be more than happy to stay there. He knows the Phillies. He’s homegrown. That’s what we’ll attempt to do, but sometimes things don’t work out if we can’t agree on the value.”

Philadelphia on Tuesday also avoided salary arbitration with infielder Wilson Valdez, who agreed to a one-year, $930,000 contract.

Outfielder Hunter Pence is the only Phillies player still eligible for salary arbitration, although an agreement can be reached up until the moment the team and player are supposed to meet with arbiters.

Asked if he thinks they will avoid arbitration with Pence, Amaro said, “I have no idea. We stay cautiously optimistic.”

Todd Zolecki is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

Related articles

Deep Stats- MLB-NL Historical Totals (1876-Present)

Major League Historical Totals (1876-present)

Years: 136 Games: 200,070 Runs: 1,814,039 At Bats: 13,673,827 Hits: 3,584,248 Home Runs: 264,780 Doubles: 602,518 Triples: 127,571 Stolen Bases: 286,844 Innings: 3,568,372 Strikeouts: 1,902,765 Walks: 1,270,806 Hit Batsmen: 97,658 Saves: 61,272 Errors: 497,323 Double Plays: 355,407 Players: 17,407 Managers: 651

Major League Historical Totals (1871-present)

There is dispute over whether to include the National Association as a Major League

Mariano Rivera

 “THE Closer”

Years: 141 Games: 201,156 Runs: 1,831,372 At Bats: 13,763,210 Hits: 3,608,778 Home Runs: 264,991 Doubles: 605,576 Triples: 128,633 Stolen Bases: 288,739 Innings: 3,587,852 Strikeouts: 1,904,515 Walks: 1,272,284 Hit Batsmen: 97,658 Saves: 61,313 Errors: 513,771 Double Plays: 356,576 Players: 17,734 Managers: 674
Data is summed based on data available and may be missing some stats for some years.

NL Team Wins 1876-1900

Dummy Hoy

 Dummy Hoy

Year G ATL BLO CHC CNR CIN LAD ATH PHI PIT SFG STL WNL WAS
1900 140 66 65 62 82 75 79 60 65
1899 154 95 86 75 83 101 94 76 60 84 54
1898 152 102 96 85 92 54 78 72 77 39 51
1897 132 93 90 59 76 61 55 60 83 29 61
1896 131 74 90 71 77 58 62 66 64 40 58
1895 132 71 87 72 66 71 78 71 66 39 43
1894 132 83 89 57 55 70 71 65 88 56 45
1893 132 86 60 56 65 65 72 81 68 57 40
1892 154 102 46 70 82 95 87 80 71 56 58
1891 139 87 82 56 61 68 55 71
1890 136 76 83 77 86 78 23 63
1889 134 83 67 63 61 83 41
1888 135 70 77 69 66 84 48
1887 126 61 71 75 55 68 46
1886 124 56 90 71 75 28
1885 112 46 87 56 85
1884 112 73 62 39 62
1883 98 63 59 17 46
1882 84 45 55
1881 84 38 56
1880 84 40 67 21
1879 84 54 46 43
1878 60 41 30 37
1877 60 42 26 15
1876 70 39 52 9 14
Year G ATL BLO CHC CNR CIN LAD ATH PHI PIT SFG STL WNL WAS

NL TEAM WINS 1901-2011

Rickey Henderson steals third base for the New...

 Rickey Henderon Steals 3rd

Year G ARI ATL CHC CIN COL FLA HOU LAD MIL NYM PHI PIT SDP SFG STL WSN
2011 162 94 89 71 79 73 72 56 82 96 77 102 72 71 86 90 80
2010 162 65 91 75 91 83 80 76 80 77 79 97 57 90 92 86 69
2009 162 70 86 83 78 92 87 74 95 80 70 93 62 75 88 91 59
2008 162 82 72 97 74 74 84 86 84 90 89 92 67 63 72 86 59
2007 163 90 84 85 72 90 71 73 82 83 88 89 68 89 71 78 73
2006 162 76 79 66 80 76 78 82 88 75 97 85 67 88 76 83 71
2005 162 77 90 79 73 67 83 89 71 81 83 88 67 82 75 100 81
2004 162 51 96 89 76 68 83 92 93 67 71 86 72 87 91 105 67
2003 162 84 101 88 69 74 91 87 85 68 66 86 75 64 100 85 83
2002 162 98 101 67 78 73 79 84 92 56 75 80 72 66 95 97 83
2001 162 92 88 88 66 73 76 93 86 68 82 86 62 79 90 93 68
2000 162 85 95 65 85 82 79 72 86 73 94 65 69 76 97 95 67
1999 163 100 103 67 96 72 64 97 77 74 97 77 78 74 86 75 68
1998 163 65 106 90 77 77 54 102 83 74 88 75 69 98 89 83 65
1997 162 101 68 76 83 92 84 88 88 68 79 76 90 73 78
1996 162 96 76 81 83 80 82 90 71 67 73 91 68 88 88
1995 144 90 73 85 77 67 76 78 69 69 58 70 67 62 66
1994 117 68 49 66 53 51 66 58 55 54 53 47 55 53 74
1993 162 104 84 73 67 64 85 81 59 97 75 61 103 87 94
1992 162 98 78 90 81 63 72 70 96 82 72 83 87
1991 162 94 77 74 65 93 77 78 98 84 75 84 71
1990 162 65 77 91 75 86 91 77 95 75 85 70 85
1989 162 63 93 75 86 77 87 67 74 89 92 86 81
1988 162 54 77 87 82 94 100 65 85 83 83 76 81
1987 162 69 76 84 76 73 92 80 80 65 90 95 91
Year G ARI ATL CHC CIN COL FLA HOU LAD MIL NYM PHI PIT SDP SFG STL WSN
1986 162 72 70 86 96 73 108 86 64 74 83 79 78
1985 162 66 77 89 83 95 98 75 57 83 62 101 84
1984 162 80 96 70 80 79 90 81 75 92 66 84 78
1983 162 88 71 74 85 91 68 90 84 81 79 79 82
1982 162 89 73 61 77 88 65 89 84 81 87 92 86
1981 111 50 38 66 61 63 41 59 46 41 56 59 60
1980 163 81 64 89 93 92 67 91 83 73 75 74 90
1979 162 66 80 90 89 79 63 84 98 68 71 86 95
1978 162 69 79 92 74 95 66 90 88 84 89 69 76
1977 162 61 81 88 81 98 64 101 96 69 75 83 75
1976 162 70 75 102 80 92 86 101 92 73 74 72 55
1975 162 67 75 108 64 88 82 86 92 71 80 82 75
1974 162 88 66 98 81 102 71 80 88 60 72 86 79
1973 162 76 77 99 82 95 82 71 80 60 88 81 79
1972 156 70 85 95 84 85 83 59 96 58 69 75 70
1971 162 82 83 79 79 89 83 67 97 61 90 90 71
1970 162 76 84 102 79 87 83 73 89 63 86 76 73
1969 162 93 92 89 81 85 100 63 88 52 90 87 52
1968 162 81 84 83 72 76 73 76 80 88 97
1967 162 77 87 87 69 73 61 82 81 91 101
1966 162 85 59 76 72 95 66 87 92 93 83
1965 162 86 72 89 65 97 50 85 90 95 80
1964 162 88 76 92 66 80 53 92 80 90 93
1963 162 84 82 86 66 99 51 87 74 88 93
1962 165 86 59 98 64 102 40 81 93 103 84
Year G ARI ATL CHC CIN COL FLA HOU LAD MIL NYM PHI PIT SDP SFG STL WSN
1961 154 83 64 93 89 47 75 85 80
1960 154 88 60 67 82 59 95 79 86
1959 156 86 74 74 88 64 78 83 71
1958 154 92 72 76 71 69 84 80 72
1957 154 95 62 80 84 77 62 69 87
1956 154 92 60 91 93 71 66 67 76
1955 154 85 72 75 98 77 60 80 68
1954 154 89 64 74 92 75 53 97 72
1953 154 92 65 68 105 83 50 70 83
1952 154 64 77 69 96 87 42 92 88
1951 157 76 62 68 97 73 64 98 81
1950 154 83 64 66 89 91 57 86 78
1949 154 75 61 62 97 81 71 73 96
1948 154 91 64 64 84 66 83 78 85
1947 154 86 69 73 94 62 62 81 89
1946 156 81 82 67 96 69 63 61 98
1945 154 67 98 61 87 46 82 78 95
1944 154 65 75 89 63 61 90 67 105
1943 154 68 74 87 81 64 80 55 105
1942 154 59 68 76 104 42 66 85 106
1941 154 62 70 88 100 43 81 74 97
1940 154 65 75 100 88 50 78 72 84
1939 154 63 84 97 84 45 68 77 92
1938 152 77 89 82 69 45 86 83 71
1937 154 79 93 56 62 61 86 95 81
Year G ARI ATL CHC CIN COL FLA HOU LAD MIL NYM PHI PIT SDP SFG STL WSN
1936 154 71 87 74 67 54 84 92 87
1935 154 38 100 68 70 64 86 91 96
1934 153 78 86 52 71 56 74 93 95
1933 154 83 86 58 65 60 87 91 82
1932 154 77 90 60 81 78 86 72 72
1931 154 64 84 58 79 66 75 87 101
1930 154 70 90 59 86 52 80 87 92
1929 154 56 98 66 70 71 88 84 78
1928 154 50 91 78 77 43 85 93 95
1927 154 60 85 75 65 51 94 92 92
1926 154 66 82 87 71 58 84 74 89
1925 154 70 68 80 68 68 95 86 77
1924 154 53 81 83 92 55 90 93 65
1923 154 54 83 91 76 50 87 95 79
1922 154 53 80 86 76 57 85 93 85
1921 154 79 64 70 77 51 90 94 87
1920 154 62 75 82 93 62 79 86 75
1919 140 57 75 96 69 47 71 87 54
1918 129 53 84 68 57 55 65 71 51
1917 154 72 74 78 70 87 51 98 82
1916 154 89 67 60 94 91 65 86 60
1915 154 83 73 71 80 90 73 69 72
1914 154 94 78 60 75 74 69 84 81
1913 153 69 88 64 65 88 78 101 51
1912 153 52 91 75 58 73 93 103 63
Year G ARI ATL CHC CIN COL FLA HOU LAD MIL NYM PHI PIT SDP SFG STL WSN
1911 154 44 92 70 64 79 85 99 75
1910 154 53 104 75 64 78 86 91 63
1909 153 45 104 77 55 74 110 92 54
1908 154 63 99 73 53 83 98 98 49
1907 154 58 107 66 65 83 91 82 52
1906 153 49 116 64 66 71 93 96 52
1905 154 51 92 79 48 83 96 105 58
1904 154 55 93 88 56 52 87 106 75
1903 140 58 82 74 70 49 91 84 43
1902 140 73 68 70 75 56 103 48 56
1901 140 69 53 52 79 83 90 52 76
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 1/10/2012.
%d bloggers like this: